the sutton report tommy skakel profile 2
Offender Resorted to Violence: His immaturity and/or intoxicated state left him inadequately equipped to effectively deal with the victim on an emotional or intellectual level equivalent to the victim.

Choice of Weapon: The weapon utilized to commit the murder is not one normally associated with violence. Its use is strongly indicative of impulsiveness, immaturity and/or lack of experience in violent crimes on the part of the offender.

Overkill: Overkill is defined as using much more violence than necessary to kill a person. In this case there were 14 to 15 blows to the victim's head. Any one of several of the blows would have resulted in death. Again, this is strongly indicative of anger and rage directed in a very personal way to the victim.

Body Disposal Site: The area selected to dispose of the body is not one that would be selected by a person unfamiliar with the area. It is a considerable distance from the major attack site and subjected the killer to much greater possibility of being observed while moving the body. The killer had to know of the location of the tree and the cover it provided.

The Academy Group, however, also site certain characteristics for the probable offender which are not consistent with Tommy Skakel. Most notably: the Academy Group believe the offender was sexually inexperienced, a habitual window-peeper, and an emotional loner. To the best of our knowledge, these conditions are not consistent with Tommy's behavior at the time in question.

One of the best sources of information regarding the behavior and background of Tommy Skakel is the extensive report of Dr. Stanley Lesse, dated May 11, 1976. Not only did Dr. Lesse conduct numerous tests and interviews with Tommy, he produced a thorough review of Tommy's prior medical and psychological records. Dr. Lesse made a reasonable effort at evaluating all the extenuating circumstances of Tommy' s childhood, including the death of his mother and the difficulty of living with a father disabled by alcoholism. Operating with the full cooperation of the Skakel family, he was privy to more facets of Tommy's childhood than any other single evaluator.

It should be noted that Dr. Lesse was retained by Rushton Skakel for the express purpose of determining the validity of assertions made by a psychiatrist from the Yale University school of Medicine, Dr. M. Hale, who had been contracted as a consultant for the Greenwich Police Department. Dr. Hale, who was given access to Tommy's school and medical records by the police, suggested Tommy might be afflicted with an organic neurological problem that could have resulted in a violent outburst that could have resulted in the brutal murder of Martha Moxley. Dr. Lesse further explains: Dr. Hale stressed a report by Dr. Walter Camp, a neurologist in Connecticut who had examined Tommy when he was age 8. The report indicated that at age 4, Tommy was in an automobile driven by a neighbor when the door of the car opened and Tommy was projected out of the car. He struck his head and was allegedly unconscious for 10 hours. He was hospitalized for two weeks in the Greenwich

2
Previous Next




 
MOXLEY MURDER SPECULATIVE ANALYSIS

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

 
MARTHA MOXLEY MURDER INVESTIGATION TIME-LINE

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

 
MICHAEL SKAKEL PREJUDICIAL ANALYSIS

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

 
MICHAEL SKAKEL

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

 
TOMMY SKAKEL PREJUDICIAL ANALYSIS

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

 
TOMMY SKAKEL

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

 
KEN LITTLETON

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

 
JOHN MOXLEY

1

2

3

4

5

6

7



Powered By CAMPy Skakel